Stendhal’s tombstone, “He lived, wrote, and loved.”

Lately, I’ve received quite a few monthly newsletters from writers, and most of them offered writing tips. While I’m happy for their accomplishments, regret that I cannot attend their book events at a cool place somewhere far from where I live, and feel disappointed with myself because I’ve been working on the same book on and off for six years and am still not done with it, I’m a bit suspicious about those writing tips. I almost feel those writers (sorry, no offense here) were obliged to offer advice so as to make their newsletters read less like an advertisement, and of course, to engage with their potential readers. (I know I’m probably digging my own grave here as I may send out such a newsletter someday myself.)

Maybe it’s because that I’ve never enrolled in an MFA program and have rarely attended any writing classes (one exception was a week-long Macondo workshop with Sandra Cisneros in San Antonio, where I later returned to lead a workshop myself), and I live in the heart of Silicon Valley where imagination runs wild when it comes to technology, I tend to question that if there’re really rules when it comes to writing, especially fiction writing.

Every writer writes differently. That’s how I think. The only rule is that there’re no rules.

If there’s really ONE rule, then it’s the one perfectly captured by the inscription on the French writer Stendhal’s tombstone, “He lived, wrote, and loved.”

And I shall add that reading is a writer’s best blessing.

Featured image: “February Flowers” in Hungarian (a cover more subdued, and in my opinion, more interesting, than its American counterpart.)

Author: Fan Wu

Fan Wu grew up on a state-run farm in southern China. After college, she received a scholarship from Stanford University to come to the United States. Her two novels are February Flowers, translated into eight languages, and Beautiful as Yesterday, praised by Amy Tan as “a story with intelligence, insight, and heart.” For more, please visit www.fanwuwrites.com