Pajamas-wearing in Public in China–a battle between “appropriate” and “comfy”

Street view, Nanchang

Wearing pajamas in public has a long-standing tradition in Shanghai, famously penned by many Shanghainese writers such as Zhang Ailing (Eileen Chang). It’s part of the cityscape, people of all different ages and genders in pajamas with varied patterns and colors and fabrics eat or shop or bike or chat or get a haircut or dump garage or just relax under a tree. Pajamas can go with just about anything. Leather shoes and colorful socks, a sun-shading umbrella, a Louis Vuitton purse (knock-off or not), or mirrored aviator sunglasses. Sometimes, people wear pajamas outside because they only need to run a quick errand and don’t want to bother to change clothes; sometimes, it’s just more comfortable to wear them if they don’t need to go to work.

In my hometown Nanchang, you see pajamas wearers everywhere, too. Whenever I go back, I love the sight of them. It gives me a warm feeling. The government says that pajamas-wearing in public must go because it affects the city’s image. “The foreigners and tourists would look down on us if we wear pajamas outside,” a district community manager said when interviewed, echoing the government. As an effort to reduce the number of pajamas-wearers, special volunteer teams, so-called Wen Ming Zhao Zhuang Quan Dao Dui (Civilized Attire Persuasion Teams) patrol the streets and communities before and during important events and conferences, discouraging people from wearing pajamas in public.

Such patrolling reminds me of the Top Ten Campus Campaign when I was a college student in China. I wrote about it in “February Flowers.”

“I listened. It was a male voice: ‘…leaders from the Education Ministry. We welcome and look forward to their inspection. To make our university a first-rate university nationally and internationally, it’s critical to build a healthy and positive environment for our students. For a university student, it’s as important to achieve excellence in your major as it is to have the correct attitude towards life and the world. Studying science and arts should be combined with cultivating socialistic ideology…’

……

The inspector from the Education Ministry arrived a week later. By now not only was the lawn closed but a guard post had been set up at the main entrance–visitors had to register when they came in and sign out when they left. Street sweeping had increased from once to twice a day. The day before the inspectors arrived, the cleaners even came to West Five to wash the hallways and stairs with detergent. The Student Association checked the dorms frequently, so we had to keep our rooms tidy at all times. During the day we took down our mosquito nets and folded our blankets into a square, as soldiers do. We also bought a few bottles of air freshener to make the room smell better….A group of uniformed workers from the Security Department patrolled the campus and would stop students who were smoking, or wore makeup, or broke any of the other new rules. They would threaten to report these students to their departments…”

Sounds all too familiar.

Back to the pajamas-donning issue, I wonder if “the foreigners and tourists” really care; they actually might like seeing people in pajamas in the streets because it’s fun and unique.

(Featured image: street view, Nanchang.)

Author: Fan Wu

Fan Wu grew up on a state-run farm in southern China. After college, she received a scholarship from Stanford University to come to the United States. Her two novels are February Flowers, translated into eight languages, and Beautiful as Yesterday, praised by Amy Tan as “a story with intelligence, insight, and heart.” For more, please visit www.fanwuwrites.com