Do you start a book from the beginning or the middle?

My 8-year-old loves books and whenever we visit the library, she borrows a big pile of them, some thick as a brick. She’s quick at deciding what books to read. I asked her how she picks her reading list the other day and she replied, “I start with the middle of the book because that’s where action is. If I like what I’ve read, then I’ll get the book and read from the beginning.”

A lot of novels used to be written this way. First stage: you introduce your main character and his everyday life. Second stage: something happens to the main character and he has to do something about it. Last stage is about him overcoming challenges and achieving some kind of goal or solution.

These days, more and more novels seem to begin “in medias res,” a Latin phrase that means in the middle of the things. Something happens right away in the beginning, then you backtrack to offer explanation and background. I can see TV series and movies’ influence on such a trend, also that of social media consumption–people are so distracted and occupied that they have little patience these days. If something doesn’t grab their attention right away, then they move on to other things that are more appealing to them.

Some writers argue that the second approach is better because it hooks readers and makes them want to read more. There’s truth in it, but I think it’s more important to establish a strong voice in the beginning.

When you correspond with literary agents, if they’re interested in your pitch, they usually ask you to send the synopsis and a sample–often the beginning chapters. Sure, they want to see the promise of action and conflicts in these pages, but what they want to see the most is your ability to make them care about your main character and the story you’re about to unfold.

As a writer, you decide what beginning fits your story the best. There’s no right or wrong.

Different from my daughter, when I choose what books to read, I always start from the beginning pages. There’s so much you can discover about the writer and her style from even just the first page.

Featured image: street view in my hometown, Nanchang.

 

 

Author: Fan Wu

Fan Wu grew up on a state-run farm in southern China. After college, she received a scholarship from Stanford University to come to the United States. Her two novels are February Flowers, translated into eight languages, and Beautiful as Yesterday, praised by Amy Tan as “a story with intelligence, insight, and heart.” For more, please visit www.fanwuwrites.com